This book is ~100 pages covering the three days when Jan and his family know they have to say goodbye. His words and imagery are stellar… honestly… he captures all those emotions pet-parents go through trying to rationalize our decisions, understand the whys, convince ourselves we will be okay, and determine how or if we can lean on anyone around us. By showcasing Marcel’s movements and struggles, we see the pain Jan’s family has gone through. It is visceral and constant. It is harsh and definitive. It is widespread and menacing.

Review 2

A WORLD WITHOUT COLOR

A World Without Color: A True Story of the Last Three Days with My Cat by Bernard Jan is a quick read, a novel that is emotionally rich and told in the second person, like when you write a letter to someone, addressing them directly. It is an intimate story that explores the last days of the narrator with his beloved companion, Marcel the cat. In this novel, the author presents Marcel as ill and not in the best of moods and, in streams of consciousness, moves on to share powerful memories from trying to communicate his compassion and pain to Marcel, to the promise that they will meet again one day.

It is a wonderful story for fans of animals, especially cat lovers. Reading about the desolation and the loneliness of the narrator, the reader understands the place that Marcel occupied in his life as a companion. It is told in an endearing voice, which places the cat on the same level as the human being because it has become a great part of the life of the narrator. The story is filled with strong imagery. A World Without Color: A True Story of the Last Three Days with My Cat is a compelling story that demonstrates how a pet can make such a difference in someone’s life. It is a story that explores themes of loss and grief and that celebrates a connection with a cat, a connection that brought meaning to the life of the narrator. It will bring tears in your eyes. Written in language that is beautiful and capturing emotions that are raw, Bernard Jan’s novel invites the reader to look at pets from a completely different perspective.

By Christian Sia, November 6, 2019, published on Readers’ Favorite, 5/5

***

A World Without Color: A True Story of the Last Three Days With My Cat by Bernard Jan is a heartfelt story about the loss of his cat Marcel to Diabetes. While it may seem a macabre topic, the story itself is an incredibly moving and powerful ‘tribute’ to his friend and companion. I’m not going to lie- this book broke me! It didn’t hit close to home- it hit dead centre! On the 15th of September my fur-ever friend Max (my 13 year-old Burmese Cat) died from diabetes. I am still raw from the whole experience- so this book was entirely too relatable.
The raw, and honest account is heart-wrenching to say the least. But the story is so much more than that. It is a story of love, friendship, family, bonds, comfort, grief, and healing- and I really appreciate Bernard Jan sharing his thoughts and emotions with us in this poignant and memorable story.
 

Thank you, Bernard Jan!

By Angela Hayes, October 17, 2019, published on AmazonGoodreads, BookBub, Angie's Books to Read, Pinterest and Twitter; October 18, 2019, published on Amazon Australia, 5/5

***

I come from a family of animal lovers and any time a pet dies, it is a cause for deep mourning.
Bernard Jan's book A World Without Color" captures the departure of a beloved animal with the right level of sadness and comfort.
 

This book is part-extended poem and part-meditative essay as Jan discusses the illness and death of his cat, Marcel.
There are moments that describe the bond between human and owner most effectively. There are plenty of passages where Jan is stroking Marcel on the head and remembers when the cat was a feisty mischievous troublemaker.
 

Jan describes the grieving process in a way that does not hit the reader over the head, but shows the stages in actions. At first Jan doesn't want to believe that Marcel is ill, but then he does everything that he can to keep his cat alive and cared for even to the end. The last moments are unforgettable as Jan sits with Marcel accepting the impending loss and behaves as he has always done: a loving best friend to his pet.
 

A World Without Color will move anyone who had and lost a pet. It proves that pets are not " just animals." They are integral members of the family and sometimes their deaths can be as deeply felt as that of the humans around them.

By Julie S. Porter, September 20, 2019, published on Amazon, 5/5

***

Bernard expresses his pain for his cat who is diseased and dying. The family try to prolong the life of Marcel, a close friend and Bernard's best friend. Bernard dedicates a book to Marcel's memory, so moved is he by his cats passing.
The author explores his feelings of grief in detail using subtle nuances, graphic descriptions of his cat's passing on and a great array and richness of words. We can sympathise with Bernard's pain, as many pet lovers would recognise their own feelings of grief written into the words of A World Without Cover.
Bernard's sensitivity, emotional depth and vivid descriptions of nature is absorbing and fascinating.
 

By Gabriel Woods, July 31, 2019, published on Goodreads and Amazon UK, 5/5

***

If you’ve ever loved and lost a pet then A World Without Color: A True Story Of the Last Three Days With My Cat by Bernard Jan will make you cry.

A couple years ago, I lost my best friend. He brought me so much joy and watching his body deteriorate broke me. I watched him slowing stop eating and drinking. I witnessed his hind legs give out. There were so many doctor appointments, so many meds, all to prolong his life.

Pets become a part of our day. They listen while we talk. We might pet them for comfort. They are our constant when everything else seems out of control. When they die, life seems to stop. We mourn them like we would a human. We miss their face, the sound of their voice, moments we could’ve had together if we weren’t so busy, and moments we’ll never have since they are gone.

Like Bernard, I never thought I’d ever get another cat. I too felt like I would be betraying my buddy. It took a while but my children convinced me to get another one. We eventually adopted two rescue cats.

I know one day I will have to make the decision to prolong life or put them down. There’s no reason to let a loved one suffer because we can’t or don’t want to let them go. Don’t let them live in agony.

There are some days I still swear I hear my buddy, see him out of the corner of my eye. I don’t get too sad anymore because I think he would be happy I have learned to love again.

Bernard, your words brought me many tears. The photo of Marcel made me cry even harder. Despite all these tears shed I must say thank you because it warmed my heart to see the love another person had for his own furbaby.

By Kameron Brook, June 22, 2019, published on Goodreads and Amazon; June 25, 2019, published on Kam’s Place, 4/5 

***

A World Without Colour is a beautiful, heart-wrenching story of the author's final three days with his beloved cat, Marcel. His writing captures the agony of watching someone we love suffering and knowing that there is nothing we can do to help them. Sometimes we meet an animal who captures our heart and becomes like a best friend or sibling to us. To lose them inflicts indescribable pain - it is sheer, absolute hell when one we love passes away and must leave us forever.
Despite how sad this story is, I loved it because I could relate to the author's deep, horrific sense of loss once reality hit him that his cat, his dear friend, is truly dying. Facing any death is a total existential crisis - to accept that one who was once so full of life can suddenly no longer exist is one of the most difficult parts of life. This story paints such a beautiful picture of the love and devotion between a human and their animal companion.
Marcel is a fighter. Despite his deteriorating body, he holds on to what remains of his life, always fighting to get up on his own and reach his bowls to drink, purring to show Bernard, his owner, that he appreciates him and his company. The love from an animal is such a remarkable, special thing for anyone to experience. But it is so hard when they go.
I found it strangely comforting to know that other people have felt profound loss after losing their beloved pet. You will never stop missing them, no never, but in time, the incurable agony gradually fades away until one day you can think back to the happy memories you had with them and smile at the fact that life gifted you with such a wonderful connection with someone.
I would recommend this book to everyone who has experienced grief and loss. To me, this story is a work of art.
 

By Sara Flower Kjeldsen, April 4, 2019, published on Amazon Canada and Goodreads, 5/5

***

This author really stripped himself down to give the readers a raw and emotional look at what it is truly like to lose a pet. Highly recommend this book!

By Kathy Harrison, March 30, 2019, published on Amazon, 5/5

***

Such a wonderful read for me as I experience d the same trauma myself not long ago.Bernard captured all the emotions I too felt.Beautiful writing and heartfelt.We never forget the animals we care for and know losing them is the price we pay for loving them.

By Joy M. Lilley, March 24, 2019, publish on Goodreads, 5/5

***

To any animal lover who has ever lost a pet. This is a great description. Highly recommend. Be prepared to cry.

By Lalo, February 6, 2019, published on Amazon, 5/5

***

A World Without Color is a tearjerker for sure so have a box of tissues on hand. Most, including my family, have lost a pet of several pets over the years. The author is a detailed, talented serious writer. It is a fast story and packed with lots of powerful emotions. It teaches us about love and loss.

By Max Grande, December 18, 2018, published on Goodreads, 5/5

***

When you lose a cherished pet, sometimes the loss is so inexplicable, all you can do is cry. When I had to let go of my ten-year-old shiba inu just about a year ago, it was a painful 2-week process. It is nearly impossible to put into words for most people how you go about making the decision to end an animal’s pain, begin your own, and suffer the consequences. Not impossible tho, as proven by Bernard Jan in the second book of his I’ve read this year. Jan lost his beloved cat, Marcel, and shares the emotional turmoil he encountered throughout the process.

This book is ~100 pages covering the three days when Jan and his family know they have to say goodbye. His words and imagery are stellar… honestly… he captures all those emotions pet-parents go through trying to rationalize our decisions, understand the whys, convince ourselves we will be okay, and determine how or if we can lean on anyone around us. By showcasing Marcel’s movements and struggles, we see the pain Jan’s family has gone through. It is visceral and constant. It is harsh and definitive. It is widespread and menacing.

I had to put the book down several times as it brought me to tears thinking of my own pet loss this year. Jan is brave. He shares everything from the moment he adopted the cat to the treasures of their ~15 year life together. As a younger guy suffering through this, he’s developing all his emotions and reactions to something he’s truly not ready to handle. I say this not because Jan’s not strong enough (he is), but because this is one of his earliest life experiences dealing with death. It is never easy. But to write about it and share those feelings, notions, worries, and sighs of relief when it’s all over (even tho it really isn’t) is remarkable.

Translated into English, the creators of this version are masterful in their descriptions. The comparisons… similes… references… moments… all bring readers to experience as closely as possible what the author experienced. If you’ve never gone thru it, it’s probably not fully apparent. Human loss is different… agreeably more harsh in most circumstances, but when your pet cannot talk to tell you what kind of pain they have, you are the sole person responsible for deciding how to help them.

I felt the intensity from Jan’s writing, and I recommend this for anyone who has a pet and/or is coping with [or the potential] loss. It might not be a good idea to read it as you’re going thru it depending on what kind of person you are and how you handle grief, but it’s something you should read when you are starting to recover. Thank you for sharing this truly humbling work, Bernard Jan.

By James J. Cudney, December 18, 2018, published on Goodreads; December 19, 2018, published on This Is My Truth Now; December 20, 2018, published on Amazon, 5/5 

      © 2015-2019 By Bernard Jan   |   Author, novelist and poet